Pseudodoxia Epidemica Or Enquiries into Commonly Presumed Truths Oxford English Texts Pseudodoxia Epidemica or Enquries into very many received tenets and commonly presumed truths also known simply as Pseudodoxia Epidemica or Vulgar Errors is a work by Thomas Browne refuting the comm

  • Title: Pseudodoxia Epidemica: Or, Enquiries into Commonly Presumed Truths (Oxford English Texts)
  • Author: Thomas Browne Robin Robbins
  • ISBN: 9780198127062
  • Page: 247
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Pseudodoxia Epidemica or Enquries into very many received tenets and commonly presumed truths, also known simply as Pseudodoxia Epidemica or Vulgar Errors, is a work by Thomas Browne refuting the common errors and superstitions of his age It first appeared in 1646 and went through five subsequent editions, the last revision occurring in 1672 The work includes evidence ofPseudodoxia Epidemica or Enquries into very many received tenets and commonly presumed truths, also known simply as Pseudodoxia Epidemica or Vulgar Errors, is a work by Thomas Browne refuting the common errors and superstitions of his age It first appeared in 1646 and went through five subsequent editions, the last revision occurring in 1672 The work includes evidence of Browne s adherence to the Baconian method of empirical observation of nature, and was in the vanguard of work in progress scientific journalism in the 17th century scientific revolution, though he refers to his work as an encyclopaedia Throughout its pages frequent examples of Browne s subtle humour can also be found.By

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      247 Thomas Browne Robin Robbins
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      Posted by:Thomas Browne Robin Robbins
      Published :2020-01-08T12:31:24+00:00

    About "Thomas Browne Robin Robbins"

    1. Thomas Browne Robin Robbins

      Browne s writings display a deep curiosity towards the natural world, influenced by the scientific revolution of Baconian enquiry Browne s literary works are permeated by references to Classical and Biblical sources as well as the idiosyncrasies of his own personality Although often described as suffering from melancholia, his writings are also characterised by wit and subtle humour, while his literary style is varied, according to genre, resulting in a rich, unique prose which ranges from rough notebook observations to polished Baroque eloquence.After graduating M.A from Broadgates Hall, Oxford 1629 , he studied medicine privately and worked as an assistant to an Oxford doctor He then attended the Universities of Montpellier and Padua, and in 1633 he was graduated M.D at Leiden Browne s medical education in Europe also earned him incorporation as M.D from Oxford, and in 1637 he moved to Norwich, where he lived and practiced medicine until his death in 1682 While Browne seems to have had a keen intellect and was interested in many subjects, his life was outwardly uneventful, although during the Civil War he declared his support for King Charles I and received a knighthood from King Charles II in 1671.

    136 thoughts on “Pseudodoxia Epidemica: Or, Enquiries into Commonly Presumed Truths (Oxford English Texts)”

    1. This volume showcases an early example of a writer applying the Baconian scientific method to the observable phenomena of nature, which means that it sort of reads like Snopes for an era where people legitimately believed that beavers castrated themselves and threw their testicles at hunters Overall, it s pretty fascinating, both as an early piece of scientific writing, and as a collection of strange beliefs from the 17th century.


    2. Five stars for being great at what it is a centuries old listing of facts three stars because such a thing is generally just not that fun and exciting to read through four stars for giving a good overview about what was believed and known in the 16th century, which is interesting.



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